Nicholas Carr, in his New York Times Bestseller “The Shallows: What the internet is doing to our brains” helps us understand the deleterious effects of the internet. A�It really is a struggle and any attempt to change your online behavior and technology usage habits is worthwhile.

It is a very illuminating experience to separate from the internet for a set amount of time, be it daily, weekly or monthly. A�People that try this first feel anxious and panic thinking that they are missing out on all this important stuff. But then after a while they will feel this deep sense of relief and realize that much of what they thought they were missing out on was actually trivial. A�They gradually start to regain some of their attentiveness and tap into deeper and less distractive modes of thinking. A�They will also start to feel less anxious and less nervous and stressed out.

The discipline of separating yourself from technology for even an hour a day reminds you that there are ways of thinking and of just being that are unlocked when you are not distracted or interrupted all day long.

There is growing scientific psychological and neurological evidence that the constant interruption, distraction and even multitasking, as well as our growing dependence on computers and smartphones is making us scatterbrained. A�It leads to a decrease in our ability to maintain attention and less of a capability to be contemplative.

How do we solve this problem? Perhaps with some QUALITY TIME! A�GenTech makes it easy. Take a few moments to figure out what would work best for you and your spouse to be completely free of technology so that you can spend some quality time with your loved ones. Ah, the gift of time! A�Enjoy it!

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